Olympic history of cheating & nudity; history of Muslims in US military; museums and teaching children about tragic events; Gettysburg beer

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With the Olympics set to begin, there has already been a cheating scandal involving Russian athletes caught doping up. Lest we think that cheating at the event is a modern problem, however, Smithsonian offers up an interesting article on cheating during the ancient Olympic games.

Meanwhile, Time  has everything you need to know about the ancient Olympics, including why they staged the track and field events in the nude.

Recent events have brought a focus on Muslim Americans serving in our military (gee, I wonder what events I am referring to). Time’s Lily Rothman is again on the case, today offering up a short piece on the history of Muslim soldiers in the US military. While it is believed that their services date all the way back to the Revolution, she demonstrates, there was no systematic way for Muslim soldiers to have their religious preference indicated either on their dogtags or military tombstones until Vietnam. Today there are 5,896 people serving in our military that self-identify themselves as Muslim.

Here is an interesting public history piece from NPR: Most museums make an effort to appeal to children in some way, but how do museums that tell the story of great tragedies handle their stories when dealing with younger visitors? Interesting insights from the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in NYC, the Holocaust Museum in DC, and the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum.

So yesterday I posted a story about beer history. But here is a totally different way that beer and history are intersected. You can now get a beer made from grain that was grown on the Gettysburg battlefield. (Let’s refrain from macabre jokes about fertilization, please).

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