Trump jokes about political violence; Newt compares him to A. Jackson; more news about the new Smithsonian museum; 400 year old petroglyphs surface in Hawaii.

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Honestly, I would rather not have a story or comment about Trump every day, but he makes that so difficult. I’m starting to wonder if we are going to go more than a day or two without a headline like, “Outrage Erupts Over Trump Comment.” I will say this about his latest: it is of course  inexcusably outrageous for a presidential candidate to insinuate (joking or not) that the way to take care of a Hillary presidency would be to assassinate her by exercising our 2nd amendment rights. I’m guessing this is a first in American history– a presidential candidate suggesting that the way to keep an elected president from making supreme court appointments is to use violence.  Lord, I know this man has a strange sense of humor that he likes to let loose at his rallies because his supporters eat it up, but you just can’t stay stuff like this and not expect some people to take it to heart (and possibly act on it in the future). There is no way his advisers have not told him to be careful about this stuff, yet here he goes again. The fact that he knows his every word is being heavily scrutinized, yet still makes such comments (again, whether he sees them as a joke or not), proves once again that he simply can not be reigned in by anyone. Period.

But I’m going to give historian Brooks D. Simpson the last word on this one though:

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But what really brings me back to Trump today is what Newt had to say when asked if he thought Trump was stable enough to be president. “Sure,” he said, “he is at least as reliable as Andrew Jackson, who was one of the most decisive presidents in American history.” Goodness gracious. Yes, he surely was. But in being decisive he redefined the presidency away from what the Founders intended, stubbornly and vindictively destroyed one of the backbones of our economic system, fathered one of the most cruel and tragic removals of a people ever, and defied the system of checks and balances in doing so. Wait, maybe Newt is dead on.

Very interesting article/photo essay from The Atlantic today about one of the largest displays featured in the soon-to-open National Museum of African American History in DC. It is a home built originally by a formally enslaved man name Richard Jones in 1875. Visitors will actually be able to enter the house, as it serves as a centerpiece for telling the story of Reconstruction. “The home itself tells the story of African American know-how, engineering, and creativity,” says Smithsonian curator Paul Gardullo. There are some interesting details and photos in the essay about the house’s removal, restoration, and installment in the museum.

Meanwhile, the museum just got another high profile donor, as Michael Jordan has pledged to chip in about 5 million. Nice. As a result, part of the museum’s sports section will be named after him, which of course is also rather fitting, with or without the donation.

News out of Hawaii: shifting sands on Oahu’s coast have revealed some 400 year old petroglyphs created by the island’s  aboriginal people. They were discovered by tourists that just happened upon them. Plans for preservation are in the early stages. Check out the video on this story link.

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